…from vietnam to kunduz, ‘accidents’ do happen…

…once we say so…

As the US citizenry remains pacified at the thought that their President would commune each Tuesday, ‘Bugsplat Tuesday’, with august personages such as Thomas Aquinas and St Augustine before unleashing death from on high, facts would fail to cooperate, and often. The release of drone files put paid to this precise targeting of ‘bad guys’, an asinine term so beloved of the US corporate media.

With the likely premeditated bombing of that hospital in Kunduz, the US would issue a flurry of contradictory, and even preposterous, excuses with its President finally and glibly proffering some weak tea, ‘a tragic accident’. Again, facts fail to cooperate with the exceptional US policy. Read the rest of this entry »

Advertisements

…is the us getting a bomb rap on the kunduz hospital?…

…war hero senator mccain had merely intoned, ‘bomb, bomb, bomb iran’, no more…

As the US MSM seeks to slink away from the US bombing of the MSF hospital in Kunduz, Afghanistan, other bloggers and less disreputable media keep the bright light of truth on the atrocity and war crime.

For starters, Kathy Kelly comments over at common dreams blog, The Obscenity of Our War. Kelly weaves in the unleashing of the start of Folly in the Middle East,

Before the 2003 Shock and Awe bombing in Iraq, a group of activists living in Baghdad would regularly go to city sites that were crucial for maintaining health and well-being in Baghdad, such as hospitals, electrical facilities, water purification plants, and schools, and string large vinyl banners between the trees outside these buildings which read: “To Bomb This Site Would Be A War Crime.”  We encouraged people in U.S. cities to do the same, trying to build empathy for people trapped in Iraq, anticipating a terrible aerial bombing.

Tragically, sadly, the banners must again condemn war crimes, this time echoing international outcry because in an hour of airstrikes this past Saturday morning, the U.S. repeatedly bombed a Doctors Without Borders hospital in Kunduz, a facility that served the fifth largest city in Afghanistan and the surrounding region.

[snip]

And gets into some grisly details of the US bombing, first described by the US as ‘collateral damage’,

“Patients were burning in their beds,” said one nurse, an eyewitness to the ICU attack.”There are no words for how terrible it was.”  The U.S. airstrikes continued, even after the Doctors Without Borders officials had notified the U.S., NATO and Afghan military that the warplanes were attacking the hospital.

Read the rest of this entry »