…aylan, who worried that his father might drown…

…love and caring amid unremitting malevolence…

Pepe Escobar in a post at RT demonstrates the power of prose in his analysis of the US, Nato, and followers and their adventures in the Middle East and elsewhere. His post, Blowback on a NATO beach,

Little did Nilufer Demir, 29, the female photojournalist of the Turkish Dogan News agency know that the moment she saw little Aylan Kurdi, 3, washed ashore at the Ali Hoca Burnu beach near Bodrum, she would be making history.

Aylan is alone, as if suspended by the immense solitude of death, just as his family’s dream of offering him a new life in a new continent away from death and destruction was about to be fulfilled. It’s as if his lone lifeless body at the shores of a NATO beach was also about to prefigure the death of Europe – or the death of a once pan-European dream of solidarity and compassion.

Read the rest of this entry »

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…a war-weary us? a us, weary of war and refugees?…

…the famous US ‘newspaper of record’ at its finest…

We let the NYT reporter summarise the daunting challenges of a nation traumatised by two (?) wars – the US, that is.

Many Obstacles Are Seen to U.S. Taking In Syrian Refugees

In the United States, there is little appetite for allowing large numbers of displaced Syrians to settle in a country still weary from two wars and struggling with its own immigration problems.

What else can one add, aside Afghanistan, Iraq, Libya, Yemen, Somalia, Syria for starters? El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras? ‘So on and so forth’? Horrendous death and destruction inflicted elsewhere on hundreds and hundreds of thousands can surely tire those that inflict such unappreciated generosity.

…a classic example of unbridled cynicism…


…the bestirring of the real us? a young voice resonates, strongly…

…cataclysmic, but beneficial, change for a doddering empire?…

That event that changes history? One politician in the wrong place, at the wrong time. The Guardian report provides the report on this young lady, Ivy Ziedrich, a student who demonstrates eloquently that there is among her many incurious fellow citizens another small yet growing group that is unimpressed by, and rejects, tiresome platitudes of politicians that had been so successful in persuading and placating their elders on issues, large and small, on which little or nothing would then be done, except for the special interest groups. Read the rest of this entry »


…protests, sleep, celebrations of weddings or births – death and funerals assured…

…death dispensed generously to all ages, with apologies only for the especial…

Abby Zimet of common dreams has a look at another time in the US. This occasion, Philadelphia. Burn, baby! Burn! An ‘oldie’ but a ‘goodie (???)’. That ‘Beacon of Democracy’ was burning bright in Philadelphia.

Let the Fire Burn: The “Morally Reprehensible” Attack on MOVE Read the rest of this entry »


…what? us senate to punish venezuela – for ‘state-sponsored’ violence?…

…is there no end to the hypocrisy and sanctimoniousness?…

As if there is no end to the thing. The US Senate seeks to impose sanctions on Venezuela? We turn to The Guardian, US Senate passes Venezuela sanctions bill citing ‘state-sponsored violence’. From which a snippet,

The US Senate has passed legislation that would direct President Barack Obama to levy sanctions against Venezuelan government officials or others accused of perpetrating acts of violence or human rights abuses of anti-government demonstrators.

And from a US Senate that had voted for the wanton slaughter, torture and utter destruction in an Iraq that had posed no threat whatsoever to the US or its ally, the UK? With corporate MSM as cheerleaders?

And, yes, that photo, impressive. One that could have been taken in Venezuela or in some studio in Miami? Read the rest of this entry »


…’winnie’ churchill fought for freedom…

…of British self-ordained supremacy and the grateful obedience of its colonies…

That the carpet floats seems magical, and its not Arabian but Britishwould prompt even the incurious to peer under the thing. And out emerge clouds of dirt, among which, Athens 1944: Britain’s dirty secret. A youth protesting then would later observe,

“I was,” he says now, “profoundly sure, that we would win.” But there was no winning that day; just as there was no pretending that what had happened would not change the history of a country that, liberated from Adolf Hitler’s Reich barely six weeks earlier, was now surging headlong towards bloody civil war.

[snip]

Even now, at 86, when Patríkios “laughs at and with myself that I have reached such an age”, the poet can remember, scene-for-scene, shot for shot, what happened in the central square of Greek political life on the morning of 3 December 1944.

‘bold added for emphasis]

And therein commences a tale, a tragic tale that would expose the murderous ruthlessness of colonial and imperial powers that fear for their continuity.

Lest we think that this, ‘We will fight them on the…’ or whatever Fighter for World Freedom had committed some slight misjudgment, we have from another British publication, the Independent, of a few years back, Not his finest hour: The dark side of Winston Churchill. From it a teaser,

George W Bush left a bust of Churchill near his desk in the White House, in an attempt to associate himself with the war leader’s heroic stand against fascism. Barack Obama had it returned to Britain. It’s not hard to guess why: his Kenyan grandfather, Hussein Onyango Obama, was imprisoned without trial for two years and was tortured on Churchill’s watch, for resisting Churchill’s empire.

The more conservative newspaper would address the same India ‘matter’ (from the release of a book), Winston Churchill blamed for 1m deaths in India famine

In her [Madhusree Mukerjee] book, Churchill’s Secret War, she cites ministry records and personal papers which reveal ships carrying cereals from Australia were bypassed India on their way to the Mediterranean where supplies were already abundant.

“It wasn’t a question of Churchill being inept: sending relief to Bengal was raised repeatedly and he and his close associates thwarted every effort,” the author said.

And lest we think that even that is another one-off, we hearken back to the outcome of the Sykes-Picot thing – again, The Guardian, with Jonathan Glancey’s (during that year of the US’ Shock and Awe), Our last occupation.

Churchill was particularly keen on chemical weapons, suggesting they be used “against recalcitrant Arabs as an experiment”. He dismissed objections as “unreasonable”. “I am strongly in favour of using poisoned gas against uncivilised tribes _ [to] spread a lively terror _” In today’s terms, “the Arab” needed to be shocked and awed. A good gassing might well do the job.

[bold added for emphasis]

…so much for ‘you must remember that was then, another time’ drivel – not to mention what US journalism is not…


…looking forward, from cambodia to iraq…

…only death and destruction (and profits)…

A post that continues to attract attention. A cautionary tale for the still credulous in the age of the blog and alternative media.

John Pilger examines US foreign policy, a policy rooted in violence, that should bring to mind that saying, ‘Plus ça change, plus c’est la même chose’. Indeed, in From Pol Pot to ISIS   he captures in his unique way, and communicates clearly the stark reality of US foreign policy, a reality that many have sensed but were unable to articulate as well.

Pilger points to one inescapable truth that most in the West, especially in the US, want to seem unaware of,

The Americans dropped the equivalent of five Hiroshimas on rural Cambodia during 1969-73. They levelled village after village, returning to bomb the rubble and corpses. The craters left monstrous necklaces of carnage, still visible from the air. The terror was unimaginable. A former Khmer Rouge official described how the survivors “froze up and they would wander around mute for three or four days. Terrified and half-crazy, the people were ready to believe what they were told … That was what made it so easy for the Khmer Rouge to win the people over.”

[bold added for emphasis]

Of course, the US had dropped, to put it mildly, not a few bombs on tiny Laos. (And when did Laos attack the US?). But though we look back to understand now and the future, we follow the exhortation of the US President to his citizens, but ‘look forward’ from the frame of reference of Laos, Cambodia and Vietnam. Read the rest of this entry »