…wealth and privilege, and privilege without wealth…

…as art imitates life

In Piketty’s Capital in the Twenty-first Century he points to the wealth of the ‘upper class’ (10%) in Europe, a wealth that would be decimated, even destroyed for several, during the two world wars, even if recuperating somewhat afterward. To support his view we have a look at the movies. This one is set during the World War II. In it we witness the strict class lines, social status to which there has to be unquestioned adherence, despite some aspirations.

The movie is Five Fingers (still on Youtube?) with the late James Mason, Danielle Darrieux, and Michael Rennie, the lead stars. It is a fictional interpretation of a true story. Aside the fact that the movie excels in the areas of script (couple faux pas, aside), dialogue, acting and drama, we have some classic one liners, with one especially apt and cutting. But first, some background. Read the rest of this entry »

Advertisements

…greatest novel of all time is?…

…that numbering thing can be ‘dangerous’…

The Guardian indulges us with some choices and room for ‘argument’, as it returns to its perennial List, The 100 best novels: No 32 – Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad (1899)

At least the bookshelf can be now less dusty. Or the public library more frequented.


…capitalism in literature and culture…

Thomas Piketty’s, Capitalism in the Twenty-first Century, continues to command attention.

For some entertaining reading, we have Tim Fernholz over at quartz who shows how Piketty uses literature and popular culture to explore and analyse inequality. Everything wrong with capitalism, as explained by Balzac, “House” and “The Aristocats”

Of course, especially relevant are those classic literary works such as Victor Hugo’s, Les Misérables. Or Charles Dickens’, Oliver Twist.

At the policy level in the US and the UK, the expectation is that action to reduce inequality will be as concerted as it presently is, lively banter in the media or at the social functions of the 1%. And as for the rapid progress made in those Latin countries where inequality has been historically high? Too uncomfortable for the corporate MSM to report on.


…are there no workhouses? is there no redemption?…

‘…If I speak with the tongues of men, and of angels, and have not charity, I am become as sounding brass, or a tinkling cymbal…’  First Epistle of St Paul to the Corinthians

…just as the power of prose can bring to life our imagination and put us into the scene, so too does the power of acting captured in a screen portrayal that is undiminished even by still developing camera technology. We have a classic novel that has translated so well into this seasonal classic…

And we see no definition needed of charity, compassion, love, society and the human family — in any language or culture…


…just a minuet…sunday eventide – in the salon…

As ‘heavenly shades of night are falling…’, we relax a minuet,

And why not a few insights from Mrs Wilbrerforce’s internationally-renowned chamber ensemble?


in the garden on a serene sunday…

In The Garden on a serene Sunday

Large predictions in history

How economics suffers from de-politicised mathematics

Historical Echoes: It Wasn’t Brain Surgery – It Was the First Economic Table


with today’s first sip of coffee…

Musick has Charms to sooth a savage Breast,
To soften Rocks, or bend a knotted Oak.
I’ve read, that things inanimate have mov’d,
And, as with living Souls, have been inform’d,
By Magick Numbers and persuasive Sound…

Nina

Martha

Eva

…ars longa, vita brevis…