…to better savour the brew, a touch of magic…

…that composer and that performer, and a day starts joyously…

…an ever perfect companion for that journey…


…a fateful decision and a day of infamy…

…the evil and its actor, indelible in history, despite constant airbrushing…

6 August 1945. The names of that day. Enola Gay. Fat Man Little Boy. Innocuous names that would serve to define a culture and describe a national trait? Articles that look back, and forward from that fateful day when the US dropped the atomic bomb on the city of Hiroshima, with Nagasaki to soon suffer the safe fate from the same country.

The Guardian, Manchester Guardian until 1959, re-posts its report of that day, ‘Rain of ruin’: the dropping of the atomic bomb on Hiroshima. Fulsome praise for the accomplishment of the atrocity would be duly accorded to US, British and Canadian scientists. The sense of Anglo-Saxon preeminence is distressingly evident.

Of course, at the time, hundreds of thousands of citizens of British colonies had been injured or lost their lives in the Allied cause, and rumblings of independence from Britain would grow from India to Kenya. The British would find good and constant use of the once again popular label of ‘terrorism’, helpless in halting the sun from setting on its empire.

Another article of The Guardian, Hiroshima and the nuclear age – a visual guide.

RT looks back with its documentary, Atomic Message. NB images shown can be disturbing.

A US blog, QZ, also weighs in, It’s clear the US should not have bombed Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The rationalising of such an appalling atrocity becomes ever more ludicrous with the passage of time. Yet another rite of passage in the birth of the nation, as re-created by corporate MSM?

…still profoundly disquieting is not just the utter lack of compunction, any sense of remorse but rather the belligerent sense of especial entitlement…


…the brew, black, strictly black, as the day summons…

…to the stroll and the sounds of nature…

And the NYTimes reaches a long known and appreciated conclusion, How Walking in Nature Changes the Brain – The New York …

…which may soon prompt the call of that road less traveled…